Nonprofit Veterinary Clinic & Outreach Center: 4635 West Richland Plaza Dr., Bloomington, In 47404

For Appointments, or Pantry questions, please call: 812-333-6242, ext 2

To Fax Veterinary Records: 812-935-5059

*Administration Address: 3410 South Walnut St., Bloomington, IN 47401

*Staff hours may vary. Please call to confirm. Dropping off a donation? We have a donation bin outside of our door that's available any time!
 

Mailing Address: PO Box 1334, Bloomington, IN 47402​​

**We do not have a shelter.**

    For City shelter hours, adoptable animals, lost/found pets, and animal control, call City of Bloomington Animal Care & Control at 812.349.3492.

© 2016 Monroe County Humane Association

What is Parvo?

August 12, 2015

 

What is parvovirus?

And why should you care?

 

We've received multiple reports and requests for medical assistance vouchers relating to dogs that have been showing symptoms related to parvo.  At the Walnut Street Pike Apartments, at least two dogs, under the age of six months, have passed away due to sypmtoms of Parvo, and one, Roscoe, is still under emergent care at a local veterinary office after receiving an emergency medical voucher.

 

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness. The virus attacks rapidly dividing cells in a dog’s body, most severely affecting the intestinal tract. Parvovirus also attacks the white blood cells, and when young animals are infected, the virus can damage the heart muscle and cause lifelong cardiac problems.

 

What Are the General Symptoms of Parvovirus?

The general symptoms of parvovirus are: lethargy, severe vomiting, loss of appetite, bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea that can lead to life-threatening dehydration.

 

How Is Parvovirus Transmitted?

Parvovirus is extremely contagious and can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog's feces. Highly resistant, the virus can live in the environment for months, and may survive on inanimate objects such as food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors. It is common for an unvaccinated dog to contract parvovirus from the streets, especially in urban areas where there are many dogs.

 

How Is Parvovirus Diagnosed?

Veterinarians diagnose parvovirus on the basis of clinical signs and laboratory testing. The Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbant Assay (ELISA) test has become a common test for parvovirus. The ELISA test kit is used to detect parvovirus in a dog’s stools, and is performed in the vet’s office in about 15 minutes. Because this test is not 100% sensitive or specific, your veterinarian may recommend additional tests and bloodwork.

 

Which Dogs Are Prone to Parvovirus?

Puppies, adolescent dogs and canines who are not vaccinated are most susceptible to the virus. The canine parvovirus affects most members of the dog family.

 

How Can Parvovirus Be Prevented?

You can protect your dog from this potential killer by making sure he’s up-to-date on his vaccinations. Parvovirus should be considered a core vaccine for all puppies and adult dogs. It is usually recommended that puppies be vaccinated with combination vaccines that take into account the risk factors for exposure to various diseases. One common vaccine, called a “5-in-1,” protects the puppy from distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus and parainfluenza.

 

If your dog is not current on vaccines, or you've recently taken in a new pup, it is vital that your dog receive vacines to protect it from diseases like parvo.  The MCHA is hosting the last low-cost vacine clinic for the season on Sunday, August 30 from 1:00-3:00 at the Dog House. Learn more here.

 

Learn more about parvovirus here.

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